Immigration and Citizenship Law Updates

There have been some important changes to Canada’s Immigration and Citizenship laws.

Our Immigration and Citizenship Law Updates info sheet provides more information (www.halco.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Immigration-and-Citizenship-Law-Updates-2017Nov-HALCO.pdf).

 

 “Dependent Child” Age Increased

The definition of “dependent child/children” for Canada’s immigration law was changed on October 24, 2017, and is now a child under 22 years of age.

Children who are 22 years of age or older and who are dependent on the parent because of a disability are still considered dependent children.

This change to the age of dependent children only applies to permanent resident applications made on or after October 24, 2017. It does not apply to any application in process at the time of the change; however, the government has introduced a special public policy that will allow many people to add a young adult child to an application that was in process on October 24, 2017, or to an application that was finalized between May 3, 2017 and October 23, 2017.

To add a child under the special public policy, people must notify Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) by January 31, 2018 (please see our Immigration and Citizenship Law Updates info sheet for more information).

It can be complicated to determine who meets the definition of dependent child or whether a child might be eligible to be added to an application under the special public policy.  We encourage people living with HIV in Ontario to contact us for free legal advice.

Citizenship Law Update

On June 19, 2017, the Federal government passed Bill C-6, which made several changes to make it easier for permanent residents to become citizens. Some of the changes came into effect on June 19, 2017, but many of the most important changes came into effect on October 11, 2017.  Please see our Immigration and Citizenship Law Updates info sheet for information about the Citizenship law changes.

Refugees: Important Information about Applying for Canadian Citizenship

It is important to get legal advice before you apply for Canadian citizenship if you were accepted as a refugee in Canada and:

  • you have been back to the country that was the basis of your refugee claim or you have applied for a passport from that country,
  • you were accepted as refugee by another country, or
  • you misrepresented or did not disclose significant facts that were relevant to your refugee claim in Canada.

If you were accepted as a refugee in Canada, you should not travel to your country or apply for a passport from your country until you get legal advice.

 

HALCO provides free legal services for people living with HIV in Ontario.  If you have questions about this or other legal issues, please contact us.

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